Goals and Grace- Live it Out

I believe in making goals. I started making goals for life intentionally only a few years back. Before that, I just had hopes of doing things. No plans <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="PassiveVoice alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” name=”” sentence=”No plans were written down, no working towards it, just hoping, things would go in the direction I hope.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>were written down, no working towards it, just hoping, things would go in the direction I hoped


Years ago, we had a remarkably uncomplicated life and a lot of free time.I remember <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325684487000″ sentence=”I remember our days in the very first apartment in this country.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>our days in the very first apartment in this country. I was home with <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325684487000″ sentence=”I was home with our baby girl Hannah.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>our baby girl Hannah. I did not have much to do, and there was a lot of fun things we did together as a family. There was also a lot of time (not all) wasted in doing this and that, we thought was necessary at that time, but spiritually not particularly edifying or profitable. Finally, I came to a point of crying out to the Lord to draw me close to His heart, so I would live a productive life for Him. Now looking back, boy, did He ever hear that prayer!

Over the years, I have become a productivity junkie. I make goals, and I believe in implementing them. I beat myself up when I wasted my time, and I over work. However, it has its perils too. I am coming to a place where I am learning that doing too much or not doing too much is not what counts. Rather, it is what He establishes through my hands. My hands, as weak as they are, as sinful as they <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="PassiveVoice alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” name=”” sentence=”My hands, as weak as they are, as sinful as they are, as broken as they are, when He takes it over, becomes a tool that can etch some words here and there, and stroke some letters, to draft some meaningful thoughts.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>are, as broken as they are, when He takes it over, becomes a tool that can etch some words here and there, and stroke some letters, to draft some meaningful thoughts.

So I believe not in just making goals or implementing them but abiding in Him and doing His will by His grace. So this year, I am making an exceptionally strong resolve, to ABIDE in HIM. Now, how does ” abiding in Him,” look like, in my life?

I abide in Him, when I understand that I am blood bought by Jesus’ death, and it is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me.

<span caption="Review this sentence for comma splices." class="Punctuation alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure there are no comma splices separating two independent clauses.

If two independent clauses are to be joined into one sentence, they must be separated by a conjunction or a semi-colon. They may also be separated into two sentences by a period. Clearly identify the independent clauses in your sentence, and decide how they may best be separated.

Incorrect: Koala bears are not actually bears, they are marsupials.
The two independent clauses, “koala bears are not actually bears” and “they are marsupials” should be separated by a semi-colon.

Incorrect: I am not angry with you, I am not happy with you, either.
The two independent clauses, “I am not angry with you” and “I am not happy with you”, could be separated into two sentences by a period, or they could be joined with a conjunction such as “but”.

Exceptions:

Comma splices may be used for artistic or poetic effect, as when one is connecting several short independent clauses:
She was beautiful, she was gorgeous, she was ravishing.

Comma splices may also be used if the two independent clauses are somehow contrasting, as when following a statement with a question:
You are coming to the party, aren’t you?

” grammarpoint=”Comma splice separates two independent clauses instead of conjunction or semicolon.” name=”Punctuation/CommaSplice/CommaSplice/Case2″ patterndate=”1325684487000″ sentence=”I abide in Him, when I realize, I am His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus; to DO HIS WILL” shortdescription=”

Ensure there are no comma splices separating two independent clauses.

Incorrect: Koala bears are not actually bears, they are marsupials.
Correct: Koala bears are not actually bears; they are marsupials.
Exceptions: poetic effect and contrasting independent clauses
Correct: She was beautiful, she was gorgeous, she was ravishing.
Correct: You are coming to the party, aren’t you?

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I abide in Him, when I realize, I am His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus; to DO HIS WILL

I abide in Him when I include Him into all that I am, my hopes, my dreams, my desires, my planning, my little life with all the people I serve.

I abide in Him, when I accept those things and people that happen in my life, the good and the bad as His providence and know that He does not make any mistakes.

I abide in Him, when I depend on His grace, to do, HIS WILL for me.

<span caption="Review this sentence for academic writing style." class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

So,” may not be in an acceptable position for academic writing. Please read the following, and consider changing your word or phrase to something more formal.

In academic writing, “due to”, “therefore”, and “so” are generally not used at the beginning of a sentence, because they generally refer to a cause-and-effect situation. They may be used in the middle of a sentence, to begin a second clause.

Incorrect: Due to a power failure, the cafeteria will not be open today.

Correct: The cafeteria will not be open today, due to a power failure.

” grammarpoint=””Due to” may not be acceptable for academic writing.” name=”Style/UsingDuetoinAcademicWriting/UsingDuetoinAcademicWriting/1277960″ patterndate=”1325684487000″ sentence=”So, making goals or resolves is not wrong, but trying to do them by your strength is foolishness.” shortdescription=”

So,” may not be in an acceptable position for academic writing.

Incorrect: Due to a power failure, the cafeteria will not be open today.
Correct: The cafeteria will not be open today, due to a power failure.

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>So, making goals or resolves is not wrong, but trying to do them by your strength is foolishness. In everything we do, let us abide in Him seeking His glory and living by His grace.

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