Importance of a Quiet Time





I cannot express enough, the benefits of soaking yourself with God every day, preferably first thing in the morning. For me, it does wonders. It helps me to start my day in an orderly way. It helps me to depend on God’s grace for the challenges that lurk around in the course of the day. <span caption="Review this sentence for squinting modifiers." class="ConfusingModifiers alert" critical="true" description="

The modifier “into the bible” may be defining either clause in your sentence and is therefore a squinting modifier. Make sure it is clear which clause is being modified by this word.

When there are two clauses with a modifier in between them, it is sometimes unclear as to which clause is being modified. The problem can generally be fixed by moving the modifier.

Incorrect: While talking in his ear quietly she slid the money out of his pocket.
It is unclear if “quietly” is modifying “while talking in his ear” or “she slid the money out of his pocket”. The modifier “quietly” should be moved in front of “slid” or “talking”.

Incorrect: Maintaining a sizeable nest egg frequently protects you from financial tragedies.
This sentence may be better if rewritten: “By maintaining a sizeable nest egg, you are frequently protected from financial tragedies.”

” grammarpoint=”Modifier may define either clause in sentence and is a squinting modifier.” name=”ConfusingModifiers/SquintingModifier/SquintingModifier/SquintingModifierWithPreposition” patterndate=”1325258411000″ sentence=”It gives me a new perspective of my struggles and difficulties as I raise them before God and look into the bible to see, if there is anything mentioned there, specifically about that particular situation.” shortdescription=”

The modifier “into the bible” may be defining either clause in your sentence and is therefore a squinting modifier. Make sure it is clear which clause is being modified by this word.

Incorrect: Maintaining a sizeable nest egg frequently protects you from financial tragedies.
Correct: By maintaining a sizeable nest egg, you are frequently protected from financial tragedies.

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”><span caption="Review this sentence for wordiness caused by determiners and modifiers." class="WordySentence alert" critical="true" description="

The determiner or modifier, “particular”, is potentially unnecessary. Please ensure this word is required in your sentence.

Determiners and modifiers are required when making a specific point, but we often use them when they are not required, which makes for incoherent writing. Clearly identify the determiners and modifiers in your work, and remove the unnecessary ones. Look for words like “basically”, “sort of”, “actually”, and “really”.

Incorrect: At each place setting, there were individual name cards and personalised napkins.
As it has already been stated the cards and napkins are at “each place setting”, the word “individual” is unnecessary.

Incorrect: For all intents and purposes, I kind of wanted to take the day off work.
Rephrasing this sentence as “I wanted to take the day off work” is a more effective way of communicating.

Exceptions:
Correct: For all intents and purposes, she is a kind woman; her appearance makes people think otherwise.
Determiners and modifiers do have their uses. In this sentence, “for all intents and purposes” creates the conditional tone desired. As well, should you care to lend a formal or passive tone to your writing, wordiness may be an acceptable method of doing so.

” grammarpoint=”Determiner or modifier is potentially unnecessary.” name=”WordySentence/UnnecessaryDeterminerorModifier/Wordinessdeterminersmodifiers/1015809″ patterndate=”1325258419000″ sentence=”It gives me a new perspective of my struggles and difficulties as I raise them before God and look into the bible to see, if there is anything mentioned there, specifically about that particular situation.” shortdescription=”

The determiner or modifier, “particular”, is potentially unnecessary. Please ensure this word is required in your sentence.

Incorrect: For all intents and purposes, I kind of wanted to take the day off work.
Correct: I wanted to take the day off work.

“>It gives me a new perspective of my struggles and difficulties, as I raise them before God, and look into the bible to see if there is anything mentioned there, specifically about that particular situation. All in all, it is a win-win for me, if I start my day with God.

For years, I did this habit, irregularly, with lots of ups and downs, and sometimes as a mere routine without my heart in it. Couple of years ago, I went through a challenging situation in my life. We had moved to a new home, and my husband was commuting little more than an hour every day to work. I had two small kids at the time. One infant and one toddler. <span caption="Review this sentence for unnecessary infinitive phrases which cause wordiness" class="WordySentence alert" critical="true" description="

The infinitive phrase, “to send”, may be unnecessary. Ensure this phrase is required in your sentence. Consider replacing it with a finite verb or noun phrase.

” grammarpoint=”Infinitive phrase unnecessary, replace with finite verb or noun phrase.” name=”WordySentence/UnnecessaryInfinitivePhrase/Wordinessinfinitive/1048579″ patterndate=”1325258419000″ sentence=”I had to get up in the morning, to send my husband away with some decent breakfast and lunch.” shortdescription=”

Using infinitive phrases can make your writing appear more formal, but may also clutter it unnecessarily. Clearly identify the infinitive phrases (which include verbs beginning with “to”). Consider re-writing this phrase as a finite verb or a short noun phrase.

===

Incorrect: The responsibility of a parent is to ensure the health and safety of their child, as well as to provide an environment of happiness.
This sentence could be otherwise written: “A parent must ensure their child is healthy, safe, and in a happy environment.”

Incorrect: In order that my house be acceptable for the pending visit of my parents, I needed to vacuum the living room, to dust the furniture, to scrub the kitchen, to disinfect the bathroom, and to launder all the linens.
While a sentence as specific as this may be in order, a simple sentence may provide more clarity to the reader: “I needed to clean my house thoroughly because my parents were coming to visit.”

Exception:
Should you care to lend a formal or passive tone to your writing, wordiness may be an acceptable method of doing so.

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I had to get up in the morning, to send my husband away with some decent breakfast and lunch. Then be ready for the kids to wake up, and face the day all alone. 

 There was a lot of work and a lot of responsibility. <span caption="Review this sentence for comma splices." class="Punctuation alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure there are no comma splices separating two independent clauses.

If two independent clauses are to be joined into one sentence, they must be separated by a conjunction or a semi-colon. They may also be separated into two sentences by a period. Clearly identify the independent clauses in your sentence, and decide how they may best be separated.

Incorrect: Koala bears are not actually bears, they are marsupials.
The two independent clauses, “koala bears are not actually bears” and “they are marsupials” should be separated by a semi-colon.

Incorrect: I am not angry with you, I am not happy with you, either.
The two independent clauses, “I am not angry with you” and “I am not happy with you”, could be separated into two sentences by a period, or they could be joined with a conjunction such as “but”.

Exceptions:

Comma splices may be used for artistic or poetic effect, as when one is connecting several short independent clauses:
She was beautiful, she was gorgeous, she was ravishing.

Comma splices may also be used if the two independent clauses are somehow contrasting, as when following a statement with a question:
You are coming to the party, aren’t you?

” grammarpoint=”Comma splice separates two independent clauses instead of conjunction or semicolon.” name=”Punctuation/CommaSplice/CommaSplice/Case2″ patterndate=”1325258419000″ sentence=”I had to nurse the little one and keep my Abigail entertained,(believe me, she needed some serious entertainment, ..still do!) with stories and songs.” shortdescription=”

Ensure there are no comma splices separating two independent clauses.

Incorrect: Koala bears are not actually bears, they are marsupials.
Correct: Koala bears are not actually bears; they are marsupials.
Exceptions: poetic effect and contrasting independent clauses
Correct: She was beautiful, she was gorgeous, she was ravishing.
Correct: You are coming to the party, aren’t you?

” style=”background-color: white; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I had to nurse the little one and keep my Abigail entertained<span caption="Review this sentence for punctuation" category="Punctuation" class="modif" critical="true" description="

There is no space after the punctuation, “,”. Consider adding a space.

Punctuation marks can be small things, and may be difficult for the reader to notice (particularly in handwriting); to make them more noticeable, punctuation marks are followed by a space. (The only exception to this rule is the apostrophe, which tends to come within the word, so it is not followed by a space). Some writers prefer to use two spaces after a period; this method is generally acceptable for APA format but not in MLA format. Modern writing standards permit one space after the period; this may be the safest format, unless otherwise specified.

Incorrect: As a table involves a flat,solid surface,it would be difficult to put books in a table.More likely,books would be put on the table,or in a bag.
It is obviously difficult to read this sentence. One space should be added after each comma, and one or two spaces may be added after the period.

Incorrect: Matthew looked at Martha;he’d been expecting her to come up with a scathing remark–something about his work ethic,perhaps.She said nothing.
One space should be added after the semi-colon, before and after the dash, and after the comma. One or two spaces may be added after the period.

” name=”” replacements=”, ” sentence=”I had to nurse the little one and keep my Abigail entertained,(believe me, she needed some serious entertainment, ..still do!) with stories and songs.”>,<span caption="Review this sentence for punctuation" category="Punctuation" class="modif" critical="true" description="

There is no space after the punctuation, “,”. Consider adding a space.

Punctuation marks can be small things, and may be difficult for the reader to notice (particularly in handwriting); to make them more noticeable, punctuation marks are followed by a space. (The only exception to this rule is the apostrophe, which tends to come within the word, so it is not followed by a space). Some writers prefer to use two spaces after a period; this method is generally acceptable for APA format but not in MLA format. Modern writing standards permit one space after the period; this may be the safest format, unless otherwise specified.

Incorrect: As a table involves a flat,solid surface,it would be difficult to put books in a table.More likely,books would be put on the table,or in a bag.
It is obviously difficult to read this sentence. One space should be added after each comma, and one or two spaces may be added after the period.

Incorrect: Matthew looked at Martha;he’d been expecting her to come up with a scathing remark–something about his work ethic,perhaps.She said nothing.
One space should be added after the semi-colon, before and after the dash, and after the comma. One or two spaces may be added after the period.

” name=”” replacements=”, ” sentence=”I had to nurse the little one and keep my Abigail entertained,(believe me, she needed some serious entertainment, ..still do!) with stories and songs.” style=”color: #1698ed;”> (believe me, she needed some serious entertainment, ..still do!) with stories and songs. <span caption="Review this sentence for run-on sentences." class="Punctuation alert" critical="true" description="

This may be a run-on sentence. Consider adding a comma before the co-ordinating conjunction “and”.

When two independent clauses are joined by a co-ordinating conjunction (e.g. “and”, “but”, “or”, “so”), there must be a comma before the conjunction or it will be a run-on sentence. Clearly identify the conjunction in the sentence with two independent clauses, and insert a comma before the conjunction.

Incorrect: Matthew went to the library and I headed back to the science lab.
The two clauses, “Matthew went to the library” and “I headed back to the science lab”, are independent; a comma should be inserted before “and”.

Incorrect: The wind was brisk but the sun was strong.
The two clauses, “the wind was brisk” and “the sun was strong”, are independent; there should be a comma before “but”.

Correct: The man’s business was failing, so he was searching for alternative income.
The two clauses, “the man’s business was failing” and “he was searching for alternative income”, are independent. The co-ordinating conjunction, “so” requires a comma before it.

” grammarpoint=”No comma before coordinating conjunction.” name=”Punctuation/RunonSentence/NoCommaBeforeCoordinatingConjunction/Case1″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”When they were sick, they both needed care at the same time and I ended up bursting out all the frustration at my husband when he showed up at the door, equally tired after a long day.” shortdescription=”

This may be a run-on sentence. Consider adding a comma before the co-ordinating conjunction (“and”).

Incorrect: Matthew went to the library and I headed back to the science lab.
Correct: Matthew went to the library, and I headed back to the science lab.

” style=”background-color: white; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>When they were sick, they both needed care at the same time, and I ended up bursting out all the frustration at my husband when he showed up at the door, equally tired after a long day.

Something needed to change. I could not continue to store all my frustrations to unload on my husband at the end of the dayI did not have what it needed, in me to face those challenges. I had to turn to God and cry out to Him, to help me face these crises. The only way I could get a head start on my day was to get up before the kids and cry out to God. He met me at my kitchen floor faithfully every day, as long as I kept my part. Those were the days I <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="PassiveVoice alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” name=”” sentence=”Those were the days I was strengthened, encouraged and transformed by this Almighty God.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>was strengthened, encouraged and transformed by this Almighty God.

That is how the habit of regular, quiet time emerged. Now, its something I cannot live without. My husband calls me a prayer addict 🙂. With much humility, that is how much, I need God in my life. He is the one who helps me to be me. Without taking in that dose of His word and meditating on it, I cannot function well.

It is here, God shapes my heart, stretches it to love the unlovable, do the unwanted, and corrects me, encourages me, rebukes me and molds me. By taking in a regular dose of His word, I am slowly changed, transformed…
If <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”If you don’t have a regular habit of setting a time apart for God, let me encourage you this new year to begin one.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you do not have a regular habit of setting a time apart for God, let me encourage you this new year to begin one. <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “You”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”You will be amazed at the strength and composure that God gives you through that habit.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>You <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="PassiveVoice alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” name=”” sentence=”You will be amazed at the strength and composure that God gives you through that habit.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>will be amazed at the strength and composure, that God gives you through that habit.

So <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”So you decide to set apart some time, now what?” style=”background-color: white; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you are deciding to set apart some time, okay.., now what? How do <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”How do you do this?” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you do this? I encourage <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”I encourage you to begin by praying, asking God to open Hs word to you, and speak to you as you read His word.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you to begin this time by praying, asking God to open Hiword to you, and speak to you as you read His word. Next, <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”Next, you read a portion of the bible and let that sink in you.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you read a portion of the bible and let that sink in you. Take some time to pray after this. Start by thanking God. Thank Him for anything He has done in your life. Commit your day and all the things required of <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”Commit your day and all the things required of you that day, into His hands.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you that day, into His hands. Ask him for help, guidance and provisions. Pray over your husband and children. Pray over your work.


There are some good websites that have audio/ transcripts of sermons. My favorites are Revive Our Hearts and Desiring God. I also visit some good blogs, as I get time. The link to some of these are on the side of the home page, on my blog.

In a matter of days, <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”In a matter of days, you will begin to see a new YOU.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you will begin to see a new YOU. Even if <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”Even if you fall from this habit its okay.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you fall from this habit its okay. Get up and do it again. Blessings to <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1325258422000″ sentence=”Blessings to you, as you seek the GOd of the universe.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you, as you seek the God of the universe.

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