How I Study the Bible


The previous years, I have done many sorts of bible reading plans, devotions etc.. This year, however, I embarked on the inductive study bible. <span caption="Review this sentence for wordiness caused by determiners and modifiers." class="WordySentence alert" critical="true" description="

The determiner or modifier, “actually”, is potentially unnecessary. Please ensure this word is required in your sentence.

Determiners and modifiers are required when making a specific point, but we often use them when they are not required, which makes for incoherent writing. Clearly identify the determiners and modifiers in your work, and remove the unnecessary ones. Look for words like “basically”, “sort of”, “actually”, and “really”.

Incorrect: At each place setting, there were individual name cards and personalised napkins.
As it has already been stated the cards and napkins are at “each place setting”, the word “individual” is unnecessary.

Incorrect: For all intents and purposes, I kind of wanted to take the day off work.
Rephrasing this sentence as “I wanted to take the day off work” is a more effective way of communicating.

Exceptions:
Correct: For all intents and purposes, she is a kind woman; her appearance makes people think otherwise.
Determiners and modifiers do have their uses. In this sentence, “for all intents and purposes” creates the conditional tone desired. As well, should you care to lend a formal or passive tone to your writing, wordiness may be an acceptable method of doing so.

” grammarpoint=”Determiner or modifier is potentially unnecessary.” name=”WordySentence/UnnecessaryDeterminerorModifier/Wordinessdeterminersmodifiers/1015809″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”You do not actually need to change your bible or anything.” shortdescription=”

The determiner or modifier, “actually”, is potentially unnecessary. Please ensure this word is required in your sentence.

Incorrect: For all intents and purposes, I kind of wanted to take the day off work.
Correct: I wanted to take the day off work.

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”><span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “You”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”You do not actually need to change your bible or anything.”>You do not actually need to change your bible or anything. Just start reading your bible with what <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”Just start reading your bible with what you have in your hand.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>you have in your hand. I wanted to do something new this year and hence the new bible.

There are lots of ways <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”There are lots of ways you can study the bible.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>you can study the bible. There are many reading plans out there that will help <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”There are many reading plans out there that will help you read through the bible in a year.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>you read through the bible in a year. In fact, there is this website Into Thy Word that will help <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”In fact, there is this website Into Thy Word that will help you choose a plan that suits you the most.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>you choose a plan that suits you the most. There are many resources around us that will help us grow in <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”There are many resources around us that will help us grow in our knowledge of Jesus.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>our knowledge of Jesus.

I am enjoying this new method of bible study called the inductive method. <span caption="Missing Final Punctuation" class="ClosingPunctuation alert" critical="true" description="

The sentence, “This is how Into Thy Word defines Inductive bible study;”, does not seem to have any punctuation at the end of it. Consider adding punctuation, or changing this sentence into a clause by connecting it to another clause.

All sentences must have some form of punctuation at the end. Statements should end with a period (.). Questions should end with a question mark (?). Should your sentence end with brackets ( ), final punctuation should be outside the brackets. If your sentence ends with a quote, the final punctuation from the quote is considered the final punctuation for the sentence, unless the quote ends in an ellipsis (…). Formal writing does not generally use exclamation marks (!).

Incorrect: Where should we put this vase
As this sentence begins with a question word, “where”, the final punctuation should be a question mark.

Incorrect: The author is quoted as saying, “I don’t think I’m a very good writer”
The final punctuation should be a period after “writer” and before the quotes are closed.

Correct:
In the newspaper, the author was quoted as saying, “I didn’t think I was good enough…”.

” name=”” sentence=”This is how Into Thy Word defines Inductive bible study;” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>This is how Into Thy Word defines Inductive bible study;

<span caption="Wordy sentence" class="WordySentence alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure your sentence is not excessively wordy, particularly if the sentence has more than 20 words without punctuation, or more than 40 words altogether.

This sentence may be excessively wordy. Consider re-phrasing the sentence, or breaking it into smaller sentences.

People have very short attention spans; if too much information is presented all at once, the brain cannot properly process it. While there are no strict rules about length of a sentence, if your clauses are longer than about 20 words, or if your entire sentence is longer than about 40 words, it may be too much for your reader to clearly understand. If the reader has to go back and re-read too many sentences, they may just give up reading… and possibly fall asleep.

Incorrect: Thousands and thousands of wonderful people who have the environment’s best interests at heart have thrown themselves into the cause of protecting this beautiful Earth from the detrimental effects of those irresponsible people who inhabit its every nook and cranny.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct. However, at precisely 40 words, it boggles the mind. In order that it not have more than 20 words without punctuation, the sentence would be best re-worded as two shorter sentences:

Many people have the environment’s best interests at heart. These people are dedicated to protecting the Earth from the detrimental effects of those who inhabit its every corner.

” grammarpoint=”Sentence is excessively wordy” name=”” sentence=”The Best Method of Getting into God’s Word! Inductive Bible Study is a method for learning how to exegete the Bible for all it is worth by our best efforts.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>The Best Method of Getting into God’s Word! Inductive Bible Study is a method for learning how to exegete the Bible for all it is worth by <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”The Best Method of Getting into God’s Word! Inductive Bible Study is a method for learning how to exegete the Bible for all it is worth by our best efforts.”>our best efforts. We do this through learning tools and skills to help us observe the text, dig out the meaning, and then apply it to <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”We do this through learning tools and skills to help us observe the text, dig out the meaning, and then apply it to our lives.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>our lives. I am getting so much out of this study. All I do is open my bible, and read one chapter. I can hardly get myself off the bible, even after an hour. Because there is so much wealth jumping out at me, as I ask the questions who, why, what, where, when and how as the chapter unfolds. For example, After I read a portion I ask myself,
 Who is this talking about?
<span caption="Review this sentence for sentence fragments." class="SentenceStructure alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you do not have any sentence fragments (i.e. incomplete sentences).

Consider re-wording your sentence or connecting the fragment to a main clause. Possibly, a comma is missing, perhaps after an introductory word or phrase.

A fragment is created when the subject and predicate are not in the same clause. Sometimes this happens if part of the main clause has become separated from the rest. A period may have to be replaced with another form of punctuation.

Incorrect: I like many authors. Shakespeare, Stephen King and Charles Dickens.
The second sentence is a fragment because it is missing a verb. It can be connected to the main clause by putting “such as” in between the sentences, by putting a colon between the two sentences, or by adding a verb to the second clause:
Correct: Big mess all over the room.I like Shakespeare, Stephen King and Charles Dickens.

Incorrect: Big mess all over the room.
This is a sentence fragment because it does not have a verb. The sentence could be written: “There was a big mess all over the room.”

” grammarpoint=”Sentence is incomplete or is a sentence fragment.” name=”SentenceStructure/SentenceFragment/Fragment/BrokenModel1″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”To whom is it written for?” shortdescription=”

Consider re-wording your sentence or connecting the fragment to a main clause. Possibly, a comma is missing, perhaps after an introductory word or phrase.

Incorrect: I like many authors. Shakespeare, Stephen King and Charles Dickens.
Correct: I like many authors such as Shakespeare, Stephen King, and Charles Dickens.
Correct: I like many authors: Shakespeare, Stephen King, and Charles Dickens.
Correct: I like the authors Shakespeare, Stephen King, and Charles Dickens.
” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>To whom is it written ?
Why is this happening?
What is this portion talking about?
Where is this taking place? 
When is this happening?
How is this applicable to me? 

By the time I finish reading, I would have gleaned a lot of insights into the portion.

The reason why I am explaining all this is to encourage <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”The reason why I am explaining all this is to encourage you to start reading your bible, wherever you are today.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>you to start reading your bible, wherever you are today. <span caption="Review this sentence for wordiness caused by determiners and modifiers." class="WordySentence alert" critical="true" description="

The determiner or modifier, “particular”, is potentially unnecessary. Please ensure this word is required in your sentence.

Determiners and modifiers are required when making a specific point, but we often use them when they are not required, which makes for incoherent writing. Clearly identify the determiners and modifiers in your work, and remove the unnecessary ones. Look for words like “basically”, “sort of”, “actually”, and “really”.

Incorrect: At each place setting, there were individual name cards and personalised napkins.
As it has already been stated the cards and napkins are at “each place setting”, the word “individual” is unnecessary.

Incorrect: For all intents and purposes, I kind of wanted to take the day off work.
Rephrasing this sentence as “I wanted to take the day off work” is a more effective way of communicating.

Exceptions:
Correct: For all intents and purposes, she is a kind woman; her appearance makes people think otherwise.
Determiners and modifiers do have their uses. In this sentence, “for all intents and purposes” creates the conditional tone desired. As well, should you care to lend a formal or passive tone to your writing, wordiness may be an acceptable method of doing so.

” grammarpoint=”Determiner or modifier is potentially unnecessary.” name=”WordySentence/UnnecessaryDeterminerorModifier/Wordinessdeterminersmodifiers/1015809″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”God is faithful, he will give you portions that you need to meditate on, for that particular day.” shortdescription=”

The determiner or modifier, “particular”, is potentially unnecessary. Please ensure this word is required in your sentence.

Incorrect: For all intents and purposes, I kind of wanted to take the day off work.
Correct: I wanted to take the day off work.

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”><span caption="Review this sentence for comma splices." class="Punctuation alert active" critical="true" description="

Ensure there are no comma splices separating two independent clauses.

If two independent clauses are to be joined into one sentence, they must be separated by a conjunction or a semi-colon. They may also be separated into two sentences by a period. Clearly identify the independent clauses in your sentence, and decide how they may best be separated.

Incorrect: Koala bears are not actually bears, they are marsupials.
The two independent clauses, “koala bears are not actually bears” and “they are marsupials” should be separated by a semi-colon.

Incorrect: I am not angry with you, I am not happy with you, either.
The two independent clauses, “I am not angry with you” and “I am not happy with you”, could be separated into two sentences by a period, or they could be joined with a conjunction such as “but”.

Exceptions:

Comma splices may be used for artistic or poetic effect, as when one is connecting several short independent clauses:
She was beautiful, she was gorgeous, she was ravishing.

Comma splices may also be used if the two independent clauses are somehow contrasting, as when following a statement with a question:
You are coming to the party, aren’t you?

” grammarpoint=”Comma splice separates two independent clauses instead of conjunction or semicolon.” name=”Punctuation/CommaSplice/CommaSplice/Case2″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”God is faithful, he will give you portions that you need to meditate on, for that particular day.” shortdescription=”

Ensure there are no comma splices separating two independent clauses.

Incorrect: Koala bears are not actually bears, they are marsupials.
Correct: Koala bears are not actually bears; they are marsupials.
Exceptions: poetic effect and contrasting independent clauses
Correct: She was beautiful, she was gorgeous, she was ravishing.
Correct: You are coming to the party, aren’t you?

” style=”background-color: #ffcccc;”>God is faithful, he will give <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”God is faithful, he will give you portions that you need to meditate on, for that particular day.”>you portions that you need to meditate on, for that particular day. As <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”As you grow in this habit, the word of God will dwell richly in you and you will be blessed!” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>you grow in this habit, the word of God will dwell richly in you and you <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="PassiveVoice alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” name=”” sentence=”As you grow in this habit, the word of God will dwell richly in you and you will be blessed!” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>will be blessed!

1 Blessed is the one
who does not walk in step with the wicked or stand in the way that sinners take
or sit in the company of mockers,
2 but whose delight is in the law of the LORD, and who meditates on his law day and night. 3 That person is like a tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit in season.
and whose leaf does not wither—
whatever they do prospers.
Psalm 1.

If God can speak to me, He will speak to <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”If God can speak to me, He will speak to you too.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; text-align: -webkit-auto;”>you too. Blessings!

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