What Shapes Your Vision?

VISION by s3ood

In the book of Genesis, we come across this story of Isaac. In Chapter 25:27, it says, Isaac loved Esau, because he had a taste for wild game. Esau was a skillful hunter.Can <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”Can you imagine a father’s love for his son, based on the fact that his son loves what he loves?” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you imagine a father’s love for his son, is based on the fact that his son does what he loves?

When I look into my life, I also see patterns where I find, it requires grace for me to step out of my comfort zone and love a child who is just not like me or just not agreeing with me. <span caption="Review this sentence for comma splices." class="Punctuation alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure there are no comma splices separating two independent clauses.

If two independent clauses are to be joined into one sentence, they must be separated by a conjunction or a semi-colon. They may also be separated into two sentences by a period. Clearly identify the independent clauses in your sentence, and decide how they may best be separated.

Incorrect: Koala bears are not actually bears, they are marsupials.
The two independent clauses, “koala bears are not actually bears” and “they are marsupials” should be separated by a semi-colon.

Incorrect: I am not angry with you, I am not happy with you, either.
The two independent clauses, “I am not angry with you” and “I am not happy with you”, could be separated into two sentences by a period, or they could be joined with a conjunction such as “but”.

Exceptions:

Comma splices may be used for artistic or poetic effect, as when one is connecting several short independent clauses:
She was beautiful, she was gorgeous, she was ravishing.

Comma splices may also be used if the two independent clauses are somehow contrasting, as when following a statement with a question:
You are coming to the party, aren’t you?

” grammarpoint=”Comma splice separates two independent clauses instead of conjunction or semicolon.” name=”Punctuation/CommaSplice/CommaSplice/Case1″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”This just does not happen with children, it happens in all relationships.” shortdescription=”

Ensure there are no comma splices separating two independent clauses.

Incorrect: Koala bears are not actually bears, they are marsupials.
Correct: Koala bears are not actually bears; they are marsupials.
Exceptions: poetic effect and contrasting independent clauses
Correct: She was beautiful, she was gorgeous, she was ravishing.
Correct: You are coming to the party, aren’t you?

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>This just does not happen with children, it happens in all relationships. We need something more than <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”We need something more than our selfish nature to love somebody who is different from us.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>our selfish nature to love somebody who is different from us. We all need grace!

It is so easy to love someone who always agrees with us. How easy it is to raise a compliant child, but the one that constantly says no, constantly stands in opposition to your judgement, constantly thwarts even your attempts of loving them, it requires a lot of sacrificial love to raise such a child or nurture such a relationship.

It will require us to bend <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”It will require us to bend our knees, it will require us to sanctify our own walk before the Lord.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>our knees, it will require us to sanctify our own walk before the Lord. It will stretch us as we choose to go the extra mile of praying and disciplining them with love. It is not easy. The “cultural parent” (I am using that term to denote the one who assimilate with the culture) ignores such a child or opposes such a child, but a counter cultural parent allows herself to be stretched, as they seek the Lord to find out how to bring the best out from them. They take it as a challenge, <span caption="Review this sentence for split infinitives" class="ConfusingModifiers alert" critical="true" description="

The infinitive verb “to ” has been split by the modifier “not”. Please ensure the split infinitive does not confuse the meaning or flow of your sentence.

An infinitive verb, which is a verb preceded by the word “to” (e.g. “to do”, “to see”), should not be spliced. Modifiers generally should be placed before the verb.

Incorrect: I wanted to very much see the new documentary on Iraq.
The infinitive verb “to see” has been separated by “very much”. The sentence could be written, “I wanted, very much, to see the new documentary on Iraq.”

Incorrect: The old woman instructed the teenagers to never set foot on her grass again.
The infinitive verb “to set foot” has been separated by “never”. The sentence could be written “The old woman instructed the teenagers never to set foot on her grass again.”

” grammarpoint=”Infinitive verb split by modifier.” name=”ConfusingModifiers/SplitInfinitive/SplitInfinitive/196609″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”They take it as a challenge, to not let go, of the one who is different from them, but to tarry and pray until Christ is formed in them.” shortdescription=”

The infinitive verb “to ” has been split by the modifier “not”. Please ensure the split infinitive does not confuse the meaning or flow of your sentence.

Incorrect: I wanted to very much see the new documentary on Iraq.
Correct: I wanted, very much, to see the new documentary on Iraq.

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>to not let go, of the one who is different from them, but to tarry and pray until Christ <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="PassiveVoice alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” name=”” sentence=”They take it as a challenge, to not let go, of the one who is different from them, but to tarry and pray until Christ is formed in them.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>is formed in them. To love even the one who opposes us……, we need Jesus for that!


 We see Issac going the easy route of loving the one who likes, what he likes. God had promised his wife Rebekah that the older child will serve the younger one. <span caption="Review this sentence for dangling modifiers." class="ConfusingModifiers alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure your work contains no dangling modifiers, where the subject of the main clause does not refer to the dependent phrase.

The dependent phrase “Assuming he knows this” may not properly modify the subject in this sentence. Ensure the phrase is directly related to the subject of the main clause, “Issac here“.

Incorrect: Sounding like a chainsaw, I was awakened by my wife’s snoring.
The dependent phrase “sounding like a chainsaw” refers to “I” instead of to “my wife’s snoring”. The sentence could be changed to, “Sounding like a chainsaw, my wife’s snoring awakened me.”

Incorrect: The sink overflowed and flooded the kitchen, not having checked before I left the house.
The dependent phrase “not having checked before I left the house” does not properly modify the subject, “the sink”. The sentence could be re-written as “The sink overflowed and flooded the kitchen, as I did not check it before I left the house.”

Correct: To prove he was correct, the student found the relevant passage in the text.
The dependent phrase “to prove he was correct” correctly modifies “the student” instead of “the relevant passage”.

” grammarpoint=”Dependent phrase may not properly modify subject in main clause of this sentence.” name=”ConfusingModifiers/DanglingModifier/DanglingModifiers/1″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”Assuming he knows this, Issac here is found to thwart the purpose of God by asking the older son to bring him a meal, so he could bless the older one.” shortdescription=”

The dependent phrase “Assuming he knows this” may not properly modify the subject in this sentence. Ensure the phrase is directly related to the subject of the main clause, “Issac here“.

Incorrect: The sink overflowed and flooded the kitchen, not having checked before I left the house.
Correct: The sink overflowed and flooded the kitchen, as I did not check it before I left the house.
Correct: To prove he was correct, the student found the relevant passage in the text.

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>Assuming he knows this, Isaac here is found to thwart the purpose of God by asking the older son to bring him a meal, so he could bless the older one. 

My point is this; Isaac allowed his vision to be shaped by his taste. By vision, I mean, how he sees the future. What he desires for his marriage, children, and the next generation. Isaac allows his taste to shape this vision. <span caption="Review this sentence for comma splices." class="Punctuation alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure there are no comma splices separating two independent clauses.

If two independent clauses are to be joined into one sentence, they must be separated by a conjunction or a semi-colon. They may also be separated into two sentences by a period. Clearly identify the independent clauses in your sentence, and decide how they may best be separated.

Incorrect: Koala bears are not actually bears, they are marsupials.
The two independent clauses, “koala bears are not actually bears” and “they are marsupials” should be separated by a semi-colon.

Incorrect: I am not angry with you, I am not happy with you, either.
The two independent clauses, “I am not angry with you” and “I am not happy with you”, could be separated into two sentences by a period, or they could be joined with a conjunction such as “but”.

Exceptions:

Comma splices may be used for artistic or poetic effect, as when one is connecting several short independent clauses:
She was beautiful, she was gorgeous, she was ravishing.

Comma splices may also be used if the two independent clauses are somehow contrasting, as when following a statement with a question:
You are coming to the party, aren’t you?

” grammarpoint=”Comma splice separates two independent clauses instead of conjunction or semicolon.” name=”Punctuation/CommaSplice/CommaSplice/Case1″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”His preference for the older child was shaped by his taste, the bible says.” shortdescription=”

Ensure there are no comma splices separating two independent clauses.

Incorrect: Koala bears are not actually bears, they are marsupials.
Correct: Koala bears are not actually bears; they are marsupials.
Exceptions: poetic effect and contrasting independent clauses
Correct: She was beautiful, she was gorgeous, she was ravishing.
Correct: You are coming to the party, aren’t you?

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>His preference for the older child <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="PassiveVoice alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” name=”” sentence=”His preference for the older child was shaped by his taste, the bible says.”>was shaped by his taste, the bible says. This was in direct opposition to God’s vision for Isaac’s family. God had revealed that the older will serve the younger. Isaac had a vision that was not in tune with God’s vision, for his family. Sadly, what shaped his vision was his taste.

What happens in the subsequent generation? We all know the story of a famished Esau, running in from the field, selling his birthright for the prospect of some red stew. He traded his destiny for a dinner!! He <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="PassiveVoice alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” name=”” sentence=”He was concerned with the immediate gratification of his hunger.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>was concerned with the immediate gratification of his hunger. In short, he was a slave of his taste too. Sort of,  like father like son!

Isaac’s taste determined his vision (Gen 25:28). Esau’s taste determined his destiny (Gen 25:32,34). What shapes your vision today matters. Because, the same might shape the destiny of your children.

Ask yourself this question…. What is shaping your vision? Is your taste for something contradicting God’s vision for your future? Are <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="Style alert active" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” name=”Style/PersonalPronouninAcademicWriting/Informalpronouns/2064384″ patterndate=”1327933274000″ sentence=”Are you opposed to God because of that strong taste that you have?” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you opposed to God because of that strong taste that you have?

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