Surrender Your Wrong Tools

A few years ago, when I was 8 months pregnant with Abigail, I tried to assemble a baby swing by myself. Energized by nesting syndrome and wanting to set up all the nursery stuff by myself, I went into action. I did not want to wait for my husband or his time to assemble the swing. Only one problem, I did not know what tool to use, and where.

I fumbled with screws and screwdrivers, the instruction manual and all the parts laid out on the floor, for the next few hours. Long story short, the swing was ready when my husband walked in through the door. He <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="IgnoredPatterns alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” pid=”5817″ sentence=”He was surprised and delighted as I displayed my new found skill.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>was surprised and delighted as I displayed my new found skill. All the excitement faded away when I began hearing cranking noises as the swing rocked side to side. My hubby went into action immediately, discovered that I had done a lousy job of somehow putting everything together and was using the wrong tools to come up with a makeshift swing.

The swing looked perfect from the outside. Until we started to work it, no one could make out there was a problem. I was defensive and made up my mind that, this is how all swings were, they all make noise. I also thought it could be a manufacturers defect and blamed the manufacturer for the noise the swing made.

I said this story to point out how I was running the initial years of <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span23" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”I said this story to point out how I was running the initial years of our marriage.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>our marriage. From outside, everything looked perfect. Even inside, we loved each other deeply, prayed together, had a happy marriage. <span caption="Review this sentence for conjunction misuse." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span24" critical="true" description="

The conjunction at the beginning of the sentence, “But”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing the conjunction, or joining the sentence to the previous sentence.

Conjunctions (e.g. “and”, “but”, “or”) are used to connect clauses, thoughts, ideas, etc. If a conjunction is used at the beginning of a sentence, the reader may be looking for an idea to connect to the sentence. While using a conjunction at the beginning of a sentence can add emphasis, it is an informal means of doing so and is best avoided.

Incorrect: Many people fear crashing in an airplane. But riding in a car is actually more dangerous.
The second sentence could be connected to the first sentence, thus avoiding beginning a sentence with a conjunction: “Many people fear crashing in an airplane, but riding in a car is actually more dangerous.”

Incorrect: And when using the subjunctive, be sure to use it properly.
A sentence should not begin with a conjunction. “And” should be removed from this sentence.

N.B.
While the subject is a matter of debate, beginning a sentence with words like “however” and “on the other hand” is frequently frowned upon. It may be safer to connect the sentences with a semi-colon.

Incorrect: It was late at night. Nevertheless, she decided to walk home alone.
Correct: It was late at night; nevertheless, she decided to walk home alone.

” grammarpoint=”Conjunction at the beginning of sentence.” patterndate=”1332763523000″ pid=”7482456″ sentence=”But, there were some occasional cranking noises, and I was using wrong tools to build our marriage.” shortdescription=”

The conjunction at the beginning of the sentence, “But”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing the conjunction, or joining the sentence to the previous sentence.

Incorrect: Many people fear crashing in an airplane. But riding in a car is actually more dangerous.
Correct: Many people fear crashing in an airplane, but riding in a car is actually more dangerous.

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>But, there were some occasional cranking noises, and I was using wrong tools to build <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span28" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”But, there were some occasional cranking noises, and I was using wrong tools to build our marriage.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>our marriage<span caption="Review this sentence for adjective and adverb use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span30" critical="true" description="

Ensure there are no adjectives modifying verbs.

The adjective “occasional” is describing the verb “giving“. Consider changing the adjective to an adverb.

Adjectives are used to modify nouns, while adverbs are used to modify verbs (as well as adjectives, other adverbs, clauses and phrases). Clearly identify all verbs, and use an adverb to describe them.

Incorrect: The crocus is sprouting quick through the snow.
The adjective “quick” is modifying the verb “is sprouting”. Use the adverb “quickly” instead.

Incorrect: The artist worked brilliant on that sculpture.
The verb “worked” is being described by the adjective “brilliant”. The adjective should be replaced by an adverb “brilliantly”.

Correct: The artist did brilliant work on that sculpture.
The adjective “brilliant” is modifying “work”, which is being used as a noun in this sentence.

” grammarpoint=”Adjective (instead of adverb) modifying verb.” patterndate=”1332763523000″ pid=”5507820″ sentence=”The tools I used were nagging, tantrums, occasional giving away of a piece of my mind and many more.” shortdescription=”

The adjective “occasional” is describing the verb “giving“. Consider changing the adjective to an adverb.

Incorrect: The artist worked brilliant on that sculpture.
Correct: The artist worked brilliantly on that sculpture.
Correct: The artist did brilliant work on that sculpture.

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>The tools I used were nagging, tantrums, occasional giving away of a piece of my mind and many more. <span caption="Review this sentence for faulty parallelism" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span32" critical="true" description="

The verbs in both clauses, (“know” and “using”) may not make chronological sense. Consider changing one or both verbs so the tenses are compatible.

When the two parts of a compound sentence don’t seem to match up, we call it “faulty parallelism”. In a sentence with a co-ordinating conjunction (“and”, “or”, “nor” “but”, “so”, “yet”, and “for”), the verbs on either side of the co-ordinating conjunction should make chronological sense. Most of the time, the verbs will be in the same tense (e.g. both past tense).

Incorrect: The cafeteria has not reduced the use of sodium nor eliminates the use of MSG.
The co-ordinating conjunction “nor” has two verbs on either side: “has not reduced” and “eliminates”. The verbs do not make chronological sense. “Eliminates” should be changed to the past tense: eliminated.

Correct: The cafeteria has eliminated the use of animal byproducts and will introduce a vegan menu in the near future.
Even though the verbs “has eliminated” and “will introduce” are in different verb tenses, they make chronological sense; this sentence is grammatically correct.

” grammarpoint=”Verb tenses on both sides of coordination conjunction are incompatible (do not make chronological sense).” patterndate=”1332763523000″ pid=”5129002″ sentence=”I thought some form of “noises” were normal and common in all marriages, and while I still believe it is true, I know I was not doing the best from my part, or using all diligence in building my marriage with the right tools.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I thought some form of “noises” were normal and common in all marriages, and while I still believe it is true, I know I was not doing the best from my part, or using all diligence in building my marriage with the right tools. I used a lot of wrong tools and made a makeshift building in those initial years.

The scripture says in proverbs 14:1, The wise woman, builds her house; but the foolish woman tears it down with her own hands. I loved my husband, and I would not purposely intend to harm <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span39" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”I loved my husband, and I would not purposely intend to harm our life.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>our life. I was just foolish. I did not seek the wisdom of the Lord to build <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span44" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “our”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”I did not seek the wisdom of the Lord to build our marriage.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>our marriage. I was not diligent on using the right tools. I thought that, the makeshift building I worked at, using the wrong tools, was the best as far as I could get at.

<span caption="Review this sentence for sentence fragments." class="IgnoredPatterns alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you do not have any sentence fragments (i.e. incomplete sentences).

Consider re-wording your sentence or connecting the fragment to a main clause. Possibly, a comma is missing, perhaps after an introductory word or phrase.

A fragment is created when the subject and predicate are not in the same clause. Sometimes this happens if part of the main clause has become separated from the rest. A period may have to be replaced with another form of punctuation.

Incorrect: I like many authors. Shakespeare, Stephen King and Charles Dickens.
The second sentence is a fragment because it is missing a verb. It can be connected to the main clause by putting “such as” in between the sentences, by putting a colon between the two sentences, or by adding a verb to the second clause:
Correct: Big mess all over the room.I like Shakespeare, Stephen King and Charles Dickens.

Incorrect: Big mess all over the room.
This is a sentence fragment because it does not have a verb. The sentence could be written: “There was a big mess all over the room.”

” grammarpoint=”Sentence is incomplete or is a sentence fragment.” patterndate=”1332763523000″ pid=”4423414″ sentence=”Years later, and after many seasons of maturing, now I know the importance of using the right tools and with diligence.” shortdescription=”

Consider re-wording your sentence or connecting the fragment to a main clause. Possibly, a comma is missing, perhaps after an introductory word or phrase.

Incorrect: I like many authors. Shakespeare, Stephen King and Charles Dickens.
Correct: I like many authors such as Shakespeare, Stephen King, and Charles Dickens.
Correct: I like many authors: Shakespeare, Stephen King, and Charles Dickens.
Correct: I like the authors Shakespeare, Stephen King, and Charles Dickens.
” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>Years later, and after many seasons of maturing, now I know the importance of using the right tools and with diligence.

Be an Encourager

If there is one tool that would take up many “slacks”, I would point to encouragement. Men need to be affirmed and rather than nagging or speaking negatively, use your voice to affirm your man. When was the last time <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span56" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”When was the last time you told you are grateful to him for the way he provides for the family or gives direction for the family?” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you told you are grateful to him for the way he provides for the family or gives direction for the family? I am sure <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span59" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”I am sure you can find one thing to affirm him.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you can find one thing to affirm him.

Lavish Respect on him

This is another extremely valuable tool to use in parts that bear weight. If <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span63" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”If you tell me, he does not deserve respect for all the things that he does ), let me encourage you to respect him because he has a God given position of authority in your life.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you tell me, he does not deserve respect for all the things that he does (or he does not do), let me encourage you to respect him because he has a God given position of authority in your life. Every authority <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="IgnoredPatterns alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” pid=”5817″ sentence=”Every authority is placed by God (Romans 13:1).” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>is placed by God (Romans 13:1). Respect, somehow builds a man up. He gets respect from his work place, and all other places he walks into, why not use your privilege as his wife to shower him with respect so as to build your man up? By the way, respect <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="IgnoredPatterns alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” pid=”5817″ sentence=”By the way, respect was shown to be man’s number one need in studies that were done by experts.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>was shown to be man’s number one need in studies that <span caption="Review this sentence for use of the passive voice" class="IgnoredPatterns alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have not overused the passive voice in your work.

This sentence is written in the passive voice; consider changing it to the active voice. The passive voice refers to the subject receiving the action; the active voice refers to the subject doing the action. While the passive voice is perfectly acceptable in formal writing, it may not effectively persuade the reader. In modern society, people are often convinced by facts; the active voice sounds more like a fact, or a certainty.

Incorrect: Rules are often broken by rebellious teenagers.
Grammatically, this sentence is correct; however, it is more forceful to use the active voice: Rebellious teenagers often break rules.

Incorrect: It has been demonstrated by scientists that smoking causes cancer.
This sentence is more convincing if written in the active voice: Scientists have demonstrated that smoking causes cancer.

N.B. The passive voice should be used in cases where the information is unknown, irrelevant, or should not be mentioned (i.e. when being subtle). It is also used when writing in an impersonal manner to avoid use of pronouns.

Correct: The bowl was broken in the scuffle.
This sentence could replace an accusative sentence, such as “She broke the bowl!”. Use of the passive voice may also put the emphasis where it is most needed:

Correct: It is thought that Shakespeare may have been a group of writers rather than a single author.

” grammarpoint=”Passive voice used where active is more appropriate” pid=”5817″ sentence=”By the way, respect was shown to be man’s number one need in studies that were done by experts.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>were done by experts.

Speak Highly of him

Make it a point to stop criticizing him or belittling him, rather speak highly of him to others. Chances are, <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span78" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”Chances are, you believe what you speak, and it will become a habit for you, a good one!” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you believe what you speak, and it will become a habit for you, a good one!

Submit to him

This is one tool that I cannot speak enough of. The bible exhorts women to submit to their husbands. Ephesians 5:22 says Wives, submit to your own husbands, as to the Lord. Submission is not being a doormat, but using your skills, your creativity, your calling; to build, encourage, respect, and follow your husband as he makes any attempt in leading <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span85" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”Submission is not being a doormat, but using your skills, your creativity, your calling; to build, encourage, respect, and follow your husband as he makes any attempt in leading you.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you. If he is making a wrong decision and <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span87" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”If he is making a wrong decision and you know, you cannot submit to this, you can always appeal to him respectfully and lovingly, back it up with a lot of prayers, and if you have eyes to see and ears to hear, you can see God using similar situations for your good.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you know, you cannot submit to this, you can always appeal to him respectfully and lovingly, back it up with a lot of prayers, and if you have eyes to see and ears to hear, you can see God using similar situations for your good.

By sharing with <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span88" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”By sharing with you these tools, I am in no way, minimizing physical abuse or any form of problems that need to be handled with counseling or alerting authorities.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you these tools, I am in no way, minimizing physical abuse or any form of problems that need to be handled with counseling or alerting authorities. I know in many cases these guidelines prove straightforward. There are lives more complex than this. Issues that <span caption="Review this sentence for personal pronouns" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span94" critical="true" description="

The personal pronoun, “you”, may not be appropriate for formal writing. Consider removing this pronoun, and rephrasing your sentence.

Formal writing should be impersonal, so personal pronouns – possessive or otherwise- are generally not used. Personal pronouns (i.e. I, you, we, my, mine, your, yours, our, ours) assume the information in your writing applies only to specific readers. By using impersonal pronouns (he, she, one, they, his, him, her, one’s, their), any reader may make their own personal connections to the information being discussed.

Hint: replace you, I and we with one, and replace my, mine, yours and ours with one’s.

Incorrect: When you add 3 and 4, you should get 7.
The personal pronoun, “you”, should not be used in formal writing.

The sentence may be rephrased so it remains impersonal:
Correct: When 3 and 4 are added, the result should be 7.

Alternatively, “you” may be replaced with “one”:
Correct: When one adds 3 and 4, one should get 7.

Incorrect: I believe this point of view is correct.
When one is permitted to express and opinion (only in personal or opinion essays), the use of “I” is still considered too informal; it may be replaced with “this writer” or “this author”.

Correct: This writer believes this point of view is correct.

” grammarpoint=”Personal pronoun may not be appropriate for formal or academic writing.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”4611935″ sentence=”Issues that you face may require more specific and definite approach than this.” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>you face may require more specific and definite approach than this. I am aware of it and do not negate your pain in any way.

<span caption="Review this sentence for unnecessary infinitive phrases which cause wordiness" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span100" critical="true" description="

The infinitive phrase, “to encourage”, may be unnecessary. Ensure this phrase is required in your sentence. Consider replacing it with a finite verb or noun phrase.

” grammarpoint=”Infinitive phrase unnecessary, replace with finite verb or noun phrase.” patterndate=”1332763524000″ pid=”5411583″ sentence=”The scope of this article was only to share in a simplistic way some underlying principles in building a better marriage, and to encourage you in some things you might have already been working at.” shortdescription=”

Using infinitive phrases can make your writing appear more formal, but may also clutter it unnecessarily. Clearly identify the infinitive phrases (which include verbs beginning with “to”). Consider re-writing this phrase as a finite verb or a short noun phrase.

===

Incorrect: The responsibility of a parent is to ensure the health and safety of their child, as well as to provide an environment of happiness.
This sentence could be otherwise written: “A parent must ensure their child is healthy, safe, and in a happy environment.”

Incorrect: In order that my house be acceptable for the pending visit of my parents, I needed to vacuum the living room, to dust the furniture, to scrub the kitchen, to disinfect the bathroom, and to launder all the linens.
While a sentence as specific as this may be in order, a simple sentence may provide more clarity to the reader: “I needed to clean my house thoroughly because my parents were coming to visit.”

Exception:
Should you care to lend a formal or passive tone to your writing, wordiness may be an acceptable method of doing so.

” style=”background-color: white; color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>The scope of this article was only to share in a simplistic way some underlying principles in building a better marriage, and to encourage you in some things you might have already been working at.

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