Lessons Learned From Quilting

“Are you going to let those rough edges hang?” The critique that came from across the table at 2am was not well received as <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span8" critical="true" description="Review this sentence for pronoun use.

Ensure you have properly used the subjective pronoun in your sentence.

The subjective pronoun “I” may not be appropriately used. Consider changing it to the objective pronoun.

The subjective pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we and they. The objective pronouns are: me, you, him, her, it, our and them. Subjective pronouns are used to replace the name of a person, and do the action the verb suggests. Objective pronouns receive the action the verb suggests.

Incorrect: When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or I.
This is an extremely common error. The easiest way to check it is to remove the second person, “my roommate”. If the second clause read, “…you can give it to I”, the error would be quite obvious: the subjective “I” should be changed to the objective “me”. (correct) When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or me.

Incorrect: Julia does not want to go on a date with he.
This sentence requires an objective pronoun; “he” should be changed to “him”.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”4188861″ sentence=”The critique that came from across the table at 2am was not well received as I was growing impatient and frustrated over not being able to make progress with the quilt I was working on.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I was growing impatient and frustrated over not being able to make progress with the quilt I was working on. My calculations had gone wrong, and I had already checked every YouTube video pertaining to the above project, No, none of them mentioned any trouble shooting ideas or particularly regarding the miscalculations I made.

” I think I am tired and will have to start it fresh sometime tomorrow.” I replied to my husband as <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span10" critical="true" description="Review this sentence for pronoun use.

Ensure you have properly used the subjective pronoun in your sentence.

The subjective pronoun “we” may not be appropriately used. Consider changing it to the objective pronoun.

The subjective pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we and they. The objective pronouns are: me, you, him, her, it, our and them. Subjective pronouns are used to replace the name of a person, and do the action the verb suggests. Objective pronouns receive the action the verb suggests.

Incorrect: When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or I.
This is an extremely common error. The easiest way to check it is to remove the second person, “my roommate”. If the second clause read, “…you can give it to I”, the error would be quite obvious: the subjective “I” should be changed to the objective “me”. (correct) When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or me.

Incorrect: Julia does not want to go on a date with he.
This sentence requires an objective pronoun; “he” should be changed to “him”.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”4188861″ sentence=”I replied to my husband as we packed up to go to bed.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>we packed up to go to bed. I had stayed focused. I had diligently learned from the experts (thank you YouTube!) I was making progress. Somewhere along the way, the sight of progress eased me into less insightful calculations, and I began the downward spiral, unknowingly.

It was not too late. I could probably make some revisions. I might have to go back and undo some stitches. <span caption="Review this sentence for incomplete comparisons" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span13" critical="true" description="

Ensure there are no incomplete comparisons in your work; the sentence must be complete, so the things being compared are clearly identifiable.

When something is being compared to something else, the sentence must clearly identify all things being compared. Often, the comparative sentence includes a word like “more”, “less”, or “so”; the sentence also needs to include words like “than” or “that”.

Incorrect: That comedian is more straight-forward with his jokes.
The words, “more straight-forward”, imply a comparison, but there is nothing to which one can compare the comedian. The sentence might be finished with, “…than the other comedian who tells long, convoluted stories.”

Incorrect: Bryan is so funny.
The word, “so”, implies a comparison should be made. If a comparison is to be made, the sentence could be finished with, “…that it is difficult to pay attention to the teacher.” If there is no comparison to be made, “so” can be removed and replaced by a qualifier: Bryan is very funny.

” grammarpoint=”Sentence contains an incomplete comparison.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”5223174″ sentence=”I might have to cut away some portion, I might have to replace or add some more fabric where it looks out of it.” shortdescription=”

Ensure there are no incomplete comparisons in your work; the sentence must be complete, so the things being compared are clearly identifiable.

Incorrect: That comedian is more straight-forward with his jokes.
Correct: That comedian is more straight-forward with his jokes than the other comedian who tells long, convoluted stories.

Incorrect: Bryan is so funny.
Correct: Bryan is very funny.

” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I might have to cut away some portion, I might have to replace or add some more fabric where it looks out of it. At the end, it might probably not look the way I had envisioned. “Better than throwing the whole quilt away.” I consoled myself and went to bed.

“This is exactly the way with mothering”, Holy Spirit whispered as <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span19" critical="true" description="Review this sentence for pronoun use.

Ensure you have properly used the subjective pronoun in your sentence.

The subjective pronoun “I” may not be appropriately used. Consider changing it to the objective pronoun.

The subjective pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we and they. The objective pronouns are: me, you, him, her, it, our and them. Subjective pronouns are used to replace the name of a person, and do the action the verb suggests. Objective pronouns receive the action the verb suggests.

Incorrect: When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or I.
This is an extremely common error. The easiest way to check it is to remove the second person, “my roommate”. If the second clause read, “…you can give it to I”, the error would be quite obvious: the subjective “I” should be changed to the objective “me”. (correct) When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or me.

Incorrect: Julia does not want to go on a date with he.
This sentence requires an objective pronoun; “he” should be changed to “him”.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”4188861″ sentence=””This is exactly the way with mothering”, Holy Spirit whispered as I gathered my thoughts on the lessons I was learning.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I gathered my thoughts on the lessons I was learning.

I am not a seamstress who sew; but, I had a desire to “do”

I had never taken a sewing class, but I had a desire to do a quilt. I am not naturally gifted or talented in this area. My axe was blunt, and I don’t have sharp edges towards sewing, but I have learnt that skill (that comes from desire and hardwork) brings success. Ecclesiastes 10:10.

All women are not called to raising a family. <span caption="Review this sentence for squinting modifiers." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span25" critical="true" description="

The modifier “in the image of the Creator” may be defining either clause in your sentence and is therefore a squinting modifier. Make sure it is clear which clause is being modified by this word.

When there are two clauses with a modifier in between them, it is sometimes unclear as to which clause is being modified. The problem can generally be fixed by moving the modifier.

Incorrect: While talking in his ear quietly she slid the money out of his pocket.
It is unclear if “quietly” is modifying “while talking in his ear” or “she slid the money out of his pocket”. The modifier “quietly” should be moved in front of “slid” or “talking”.

Incorrect: Maintaining a sizeable nest egg frequently protects you from financial tragedies.
This sentence may be better if rewritten: “By maintaining a sizeable nest egg, you are frequently protected from financial tragedies.”

” grammarpoint=”Modifier may define either clause in sentence and is a squinting modifier.” patterndate=”1335696231000″ pid=”5084793″ sentence=”All born again women are called in the image of the Creator to bring forth life, to reflect our God in bringing forth, bearing, growing and sustaining life.” shortdescription=”

The modifier “in the image of the Creator” may be defining either clause in your sentence and is therefore a squinting modifier. Make sure it is clear which clause is being modified by this word.

Incorrect: Maintaining a sizeable nest egg frequently protects you from financial tragedies.
Correct: By maintaining a sizeable nest egg, you are frequently protected from financial tragedies.

” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>All born again women are called in the image of the Creator to bring <span caption="Review this sentence for adverb placement." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span26" critical="true" description="

Ensure the adverb in your sentence is not between the verb and its direct object.

The adverb (“forth”) may not be correctly positioned in the sentence; consider moving it.

An adverb is a word which modifies a verb; it describes how or when that verb takes place. Most adverbs end in –ly, but not all of them. Be sure to look for words which may be nouns or adjectives but are acting like adverbs. An adverb should not be placed between the verb it is modifying, and the direct object (whatever the verb may be modifying).

Incorrect: The woman applied smoothly the lipstick.
The adverb “smoothly” should not be between the verb “applied” and the direct object, “the lipstick”. The sentence could be re-written as “The woman applied the lipstick smoothly” or “The woman smoothly applied the lipstick”.

Incorrect: I poured slowly the milk into the glass.
So that the verb “poured” is not separated from the direct object “the milk”, the adverb “slowly” should be moved in front of the verb: I slowly poured the milk into the glass.

Incorrect: Mary just went yesterday to the market.
“Yesterday” is being used as an adverb in this sentence (describing when Mary went). The sentence would be better if written: Mary just went to the market yesterday.

” grammarpoint=”Adverb incorrectly positioned between verb and its direct object.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”6493445″ sentence=”All born again women are called in the image of the Creator to bring forth life, to reflect our God in bringing forth, bearing, growing and sustaining life.” shortdescription=”

The adverb (“forth”) may not be correctly positioned in the sentence; consider moving it so it’s not between the verb and its direct object.

Incorrect: I poured slowly the milk into the glass.
Correct: I slowly poured the milk into the glass.

“>forth life, to reflect our God in bringing forth, bearing, growing and sustaining life. A saved woman is never more like her Creator than when she is actively involved in reflecting her God by giving life. Giving life, not just to biological children, but partnering with God in conceiving a prayer for the salvation of the lost, allowing her body, mind and soul to be stretched while bearing them in patience, interceding, feeding them right and waiting for the day they will be born into the kingdom of God. Finally, when they are born, any mother knows, the laboring does not end there. Discipling, modeling, enduring…the work never ends. At the end of it, you know it was a privilege to partner with God himself!

Gather the supplies; learn on the go.

The list was given, There were some basic things I had to gather. Some tools I needed to buy, to measure and divide the fabric. I learned as <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span42" critical="true" description="Review this sentence for pronoun use.

Ensure you have properly used the subjective pronoun in your sentence.

The subjective pronoun “I” may not be appropriately used. Consider changing it to the objective pronoun.

The subjective pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we and they. The objective pronouns are: me, you, him, her, it, our and them. Subjective pronouns are used to replace the name of a person, and do the action the verb suggests. Objective pronouns receive the action the verb suggests.

Incorrect: When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or I.
This is an extremely common error. The easiest way to check it is to remove the second person, “my roommate”. If the second clause read, “…you can give it to I”, the error would be quite obvious: the subjective “I” should be changed to the objective “me”. (correct) When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or me.

Incorrect: Julia does not want to go on a date with he.
This sentence requires an objective pronoun; “he” should be changed to “him”.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”4188861″ sentence=”I learned as I started.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I started. I watched others doing it, made up my own methods of what worked for me within my limitations and provisions. That is how my quilting began.

So is parenting, whether biological or spiritual, you need some tools to get yourself ready. Spiritual disciplines become a necessity as you start to work on dividing the word accurately and envisioning the growth. We cannot wait until we have learnt it all, to start parenting. We start on the go, and we learn on the go.

Caught in the drudgery? Your vision will get you through.
I started with excitement. I was eager to use all the tools. I showed off my new found skills to my husband. The new rotary cutter was giving me a thrill as <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span53" critical="true" description="Review this sentence for pronoun use.

Ensure you have properly used the subjective pronoun in your sentence.

The subjective pronoun “I” may not be appropriately used. Consider changing it to the objective pronoun.

The subjective pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we and they. The objective pronouns are: me, you, him, her, it, our and them. Subjective pronouns are used to replace the name of a person, and do the action the verb suggests. Objective pronouns receive the action the verb suggests.

Incorrect: When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or I.
This is an extremely common error. The easiest way to check it is to remove the second person, “my roommate”. If the second clause read, “…you can give it to I”, the error would be quite obvious: the subjective “I” should be changed to the objective “me”. (correct) When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or me.

Incorrect: Julia does not want to go on a date with he.
This sentence requires an objective pronoun; “he” should be changed to “him”.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”4188861″ sentence=”The new rotary cutter was giving me a thrill as I saw endless possibilities with it in the future.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I saw endless possibilities with it, in the future. Slowly though, I was doing the same things over and over again. Measuring fabrics, squaring fabrics; measuring fabrics, squaring fabrics… over and over… with no end in sight. I wondered when I would do something exciting, something new…something lovely to look at. I also wondered if I would ever go beyond this drudgery! What got me through was picturing the finished quilt in my mind. A little more toil, a little more stretching…soon I could hold a finished piece.

Yes, washing dishes over and over, repeating the same counsel over and over, cooking meals, over and over, wondering if any profit is coming, even wondering if skipping a meal would do any harm? Mundaneness takes away perspective and soon our vision is lost. It is easy to get caught and lost in the banality of toil. <span caption="Review this sentence for adjective and adverb use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span60" critical="true" description="

Ensure there are no adjectives modifying verbs.

The adjective “firm” is describing the verb “…be“. Consider changing the adjective to an adverb.

Adjectives are used to modify nouns, while adverbs are used to modify verbs (as well as adjectives, other adverbs, clauses and phrases). Clearly identify all verbs, and use an adverb to describe them.

Incorrect: The crocus is sprouting quick through the snow.
The adjective “quick” is modifying the verb “is sprouting”. Use the adverb “quickly” instead.

Incorrect: The artist worked brilliant on that sculpture.
The verb “worked” is being described by the adjective “brilliant”. The adjective should be replaced by an adverb “brilliantly”.

Correct: The artist did brilliant work on that sculpture.
The adjective “brilliant” is modifying “work”, which is being used as a noun in this sentence.

” grammarpoint=”Adjective (instead of adverb) modifying verb.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”5507963″ sentence=”But take heart, the bible says in 1 cor 15:58 “…be firm, unmovable, busily occupied at all times in the Lord’s work, knowing that your toil is not fruitless in the Lord.”” shortdescription=”

The adjective “firm” is describing the verb “…be“. Consider changing the adjective to an adverb.

Incorrect: The artist worked brilliant on that sculpture.
Correct: The artist worked brilliantly on that sculpture.
Correct: The artist did brilliant work on that sculpture.

” style=”font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>But take heart, the bible says in 1 cor 15:58 “…be firm, unmovable, busily occupied at all times in the Lord’s work, knowing that your toil is not fruitless in the Lord.”

Your calculations may go wrong.

I was miserable when I found out my calculations had gone wrong. I had to run to the store again to get additional fabric. I resolved not to get myself all eased up seeing the progress and beauty. Only to find out, I missed out on my calculations, AGAIN! There were mishaps all along. Revisions, undoing, cutting away; also some form of “There is nothing more I can do, if it is bare, its bare!” <span caption="Review this sentence for comma use, particularly around “interrupters”." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span73" critical="true" description="

The interrupter “at the end” may be better emphasised by the use of commas. Consider separating your interrupter from the rest of the sentence by the use of commas.

When we use an “interrupter” in the middle of the sentence, it should be emphasised with commas. Without the use of commas, the flow of the sentence may be awkward for the reader. Some “interrupters” are: “in fact”, “to say the least”, “however”, “generally speaking”, and “unfortunately”.

Incorrect: Queen Victoria was as they say a formidable woman.
The interrupter “as they say” should have a comma before and after it to emphasise its separation from the rest of the sentence.

Incorrect: Having demonstrated a decided lack of ethics, the CEO was needless to say dismissed from the company.
The interrupter “needless to say” should have a comma before and after it.

” grammarpoint=”Comma-mark missing where expected.” patterndate=”1335696231000″ pid=”3670753″ sentence=”All the while silently hoping that at the end, the quilt will be beautiful to the beholder and that the mishaps would be minor and negligent, when the whole quilt is laid out.” shortdescription=”

The interrupter “at the end” may be better emphasised by the use of commas. Consider separating your interrupter from the rest of the sentence by the use of commas.

Incorrect: Queen Victoria was as they say a formidable woman.
Correct: Queen Victoria was, as they say, a formidable woman.

” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>All the while silently hoping that at the end, the quilt will be beautiful to the beholder and that the mishaps would be minorand negligent, when the whole quilt is laid out. <span caption="Review this sentence for punctuation." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span78" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have properly used punctuation in your sentence, particularly when using an appositive.

The appositive “the finished product” may require commas. Consider putting a comma on either side of this appositive.

An appositive is a noun or pronoun (perhaps with some adjectives, etc.) which adds extra information to clarify a noun in the sentence. Take this sentence, for instance: “My mom Angela is a good cook.” “Angela” is the appositive for “mom”. If the appositive is not necessary to understand the sentence, there should be commas around the appositive. If the appositive is necessary to understand the sentence, don’t put commas around it.

Incorrect: A brilliant young painter the artist was given his own show at the age of 19.
The appositive “a brilliant young painter” is not required to understand this sentence; there should be a comma after “painter” (but not at the beginning of the appositive, as it is at the beginning of the sentence).

Incorrect: The professor, Dr. Kendrick, was a wonderful teacher.
The appositive, “Dr. Kendrick”, is necessary in order to understand which professor was a wonderful teacher, so there is no need for commas around it.

Correct: The rose, a deep red blood drop, stood out amongst the tiny white flowers.
Because “a deep red blood drop” is not necessary to understand what the rose was doing, commas are required on either side of the appositive.

” grammarpoint=”Comma-mark missing where expected.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”3576951″ sentence=”Truth being, the finished product was extremely forgiving, the mishaps were not easily identified, the errors were there, but the wholeness took the negligent errors out of sight.” shortdescription=”

The appositive “the finished product” may require commas. Consider putting a comma on either side of this appositive.

Incorrect: The professor, Dr. Kendrick, was a wonderful teacher.
Correct: The professor Dr. Kendrick was a wonderful teacher.
Correct: The rose, a deep red blood drop, stood out amongst the tiny white flowers.

” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>Truth being, the finished product was extremely forgiving, the mishaps were not easily identified, the errors were there, but the wholeness took the negligent errors out of sight.

Mothering lets me know my weaknesses in a way nothing else can. If I ever needed to be humbled, I just need to look at my children, their natural sinfulness, the original sin lived out in the everyday life of these little sons of Adam and daughter of Eve, and boy, there is no more room for pride! I know all my calculations may go wrong. I might need to do constant revisions and undoing. I sometimes see the mishaps and give up saying, “Lord, there is nothing more I can do, will your grace supernaturally cover my limitations and make them beautiful on the day you display your bride?” He has promised, He will. “Now to him who is able to keep you from stumbling and to present you blameless before the presence of his glory with great joy…” Jude 1:24.

It will leave you with messes.



It was evident that I had been working. As <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span93" critical="true" description="Review this sentence for pronoun use.

Ensure you have properly used the subjective pronoun in your sentence.

The subjective pronoun “I” may not be appropriately used. Consider changing it to the objective pronoun.

The subjective pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we and they. The objective pronouns are: me, you, him, her, it, our and them. Subjective pronouns are used to replace the name of a person, and do the action the verb suggests. Objective pronouns receive the action the verb suggests.

Incorrect: When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or I.
This is an extremely common error. The easiest way to check it is to remove the second person, “my roommate”. If the second clause read, “…you can give it to I”, the error would be quite obvious: the subjective “I” should be changed to the objective “me”. (correct) When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or me.

Incorrect: Julia does not want to go on a date with he.
This sentence requires an objective pronoun; “he” should be changed to “him”.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”4188861″ sentence=”As I moved from rooms to rooms, I picked up threads and strings and carried it everywhere.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I moved from rooms to rooms, I picked up threads and strings and carried it everywhere. Our house needed a robust cleaning when I was done with the project. <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun usage" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span95" critical="true" description="

Ensure the verbs and pronouns relate to the singular indefinite pronoun in your sentence, “Anyone”. Consider changing the word to agree with the pronoun.

Indefinite pronouns are words like a few, some, each, everything, none, and either. Indefinite pronouns are always singular. The pronouns or verbs which refer to the indefinite pronoun should also be in the singular.

Incorrect: Something on my computer are making it slow.
The verb, “are”, must agree with the indefinite pronoun, “something”. The verb should be changed to “is”.

Incorrect: Each of the scientific inventions was presented by their inventor.
The possessive pronoun, “their”, does not agree with the indefinite pronoun, “each”. The possessive pronoun should be changed to “its”.

Exception:
English sometimes makes it difficult for a sentence to be politically correct, as we have no polite gender-neutral pronoun for people (it is impolite to refer to a person as “it”, and selecting one gender may not be appropriate). In this case, one may replace a singular noun with either he or she, or a plural pronoun.

” grammarpoint=”Pronouns and verbs which refer to indefinite pronoun are in the wrong form.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”5788608″ sentence=”Anyone who works with children know they are messy.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>Anyone who works with children know they are messy. Sticky oatmeal, constant dirty dishes, laundry mountains, talk about the flu season; it’s vomit, vomit everywhere!


Proverbs 14:4 says Where there are no oxen, the manger is empty, but from the strength of an ox comes an abundant harvest. <span caption="Review this sentence for incomplete comparisons" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span99" critical="true" description="

Ensure there are no incomplete comparisons in your work; the sentence must be complete, so the things being compared are clearly identifiable.

When something is being compared to something else, the sentence must clearly identify all things being compared. Often, the comparative sentence includes a word like “more”, “less”, or “so”; the sentence also needs to include words like “than” or “that”.

Incorrect: That comedian is more straight-forward with his jokes.
The words, “more straight-forward”, imply a comparison, but there is nothing to which one can compare the comedian. The sentence might be finished with, “…than the other comedian who tells long, convoluted stories.”

Incorrect: Bryan is so funny.
The word, “so”, implies a comparison should be made. If a comparison is to be made, the sentence could be finished with, “…that it is difficult to pay attention to the teacher.” If there is no comparison to be made, “so” can be removed and replaced by a qualifier: Bryan is very funny.

” grammarpoint=”Sentence contains an incomplete comparison.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”5223174″ sentence=”Yes, probably I could keep my house cleaner and my body a little more fit if I did not have children.” shortdescription=”

Ensure there are no incomplete comparisons in your work; the sentence must be complete, so the things being compared are clearly identifiable.

Incorrect: That comedian is more straight-forward with his jokes.
Correct: That comedian is more straight-forward with his jokes than the other comedian who tells long, convoluted stories.

Incorrect: Bryan is so funny.
Correct: Bryan is very funny.

” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>Yes, probably I could keep my house cleaner and my body a little more fit if I did not have children. In the midst of all the messes they create, I am building the strength of these “oxen” that one day these unruly “oxen” might give their hearts to the Lord, and there will be an abundant harvest! I am building a kingdom and allowing God to extend His kingdom right through my home. Yes, my messy home!

It has to be given away.

Euphoria is the term that comes close to describing the joy of seeing the finished quilt. I <span caption="Review this sentence for verb tense sequence." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span109" critical="true" description="

Ensure you have used the proper verb sequence if one action occurs before another.

The verb “knew” may not be in the proper tense. Consider changing it to the past perfect tense (“had” + past-tense verb).

The past perfect tense is used to show that one action in a sentence finishes before a second action begins. Words like “before” and “after” are indicators that the past perfect tense may be used; however, there are no strict rules for this situation. You must choose the best verb tense for your sentence.

Correct: After he tied his shoes, he left the house.
Correct: After he had tied his shoes, he left the house.

Because the chronology is clear from the context, both of these sentences are considered to be grammatically correct.

Incorrect: The maitre d’ poured the dessert wine, but not until the cake was cut.
In this past-tense sentence, the cutting of the cake must be finished before the wine can be poured (note the words “but not until”). Because of this, the second clause should use the past perfect tense: “…but not until the cake had been cut”.

Incorrect: The baby ripped the book before the mother noticed.
The first clause happens before the second one, so the first clause should read: “The baby had ripped the book…”

” grammarpoint=”Wrong Sequence of Tenses” patterndate=”1335696232000″ pid=”4472238″ sentence=”I knew even before I had started, that I was not going to keep it.” shortdescription=”

The verb “knew” may not be in the proper tense. Consider changing it to the past perfect tense.

Incorrect: The maitre d’ poured the dessert wine, but not until the cake was cut.
Correct: The maitre d’ poured the dessert wine, but not until the cake had been cut.

” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>knew even before I had started, that I was not going to keep it. I had made it for a friend’s baby. It was to be given away. As <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span110" critical="true" description="Review this sentence for pronoun use.

Ensure you have properly used the subjective pronoun in your sentence.

The subjective pronoun “I” may not be appropriately used. Consider changing it to the objective pronoun.

The subjective pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we and they. The objective pronouns are: me, you, him, her, it, our and them. Subjective pronouns are used to replace the name of a person, and do the action the verb suggests. Objective pronouns receive the action the verb suggests.

Incorrect: When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or I.
This is an extremely common error. The easiest way to check it is to remove the second person, “my roommate”. If the second clause read, “…you can give it to I”, the error would be quite obvious: the subjective “I” should be changed to the objective “me”. (correct) When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or me.

Incorrect: Julia does not want to go on a date with he.
This sentence requires an objective pronoun; “he” should be changed to “him”.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”4188861″ sentence=”As I was working, I only saw bits and pieces.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I was working, I only saw bits and pieces. Make bits and pieces, join them together. That’s all I did. I continued to do that for so many days, because the instructions said if I did it accordingly, in the end it was going to be a beautiful quilt. I got to see the end only when I was done. Until then, all I had was bits and pieces, and I was to sew them together and wait for a beautiful product. When it was finally done, I gave it away with joy knowing someone is going to be blessed.

Day in and day out as <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span116" critical="true" description="Review this sentence for pronoun use.

Ensure you have properly used the subjective pronoun in your sentence.

The subjective pronoun “I” may not be appropriately used. Consider changing it to the objective pronoun.

The subjective pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we and they. The objective pronouns are: me, you, him, her, it, our and them. Subjective pronouns are used to replace the name of a person, and do the action the verb suggests. Objective pronouns receive the action the verb suggests.

Incorrect: When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or I.
This is an extremely common error. The easiest way to check it is to remove the second person, “my roommate”. If the second clause read, “…you can give it to I”, the error would be quite obvious: the subjective “I” should be changed to the objective “me”. (correct) When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or me.

Incorrect: Julia does not want to go on a date with he.
This sentence requires an objective pronoun; “he” should be changed to “him”.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”4188861″ sentence=”Day in and day out as I say stories, pray scriptures, counsel, teach and train my children, that is what I am doing.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>I say stories, pray scriptures, counsel, teach and train my children, that is what I am doing. All I have now is bits of <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun/noun agreement, particularly when using “this”" class="IgnoredPatterns alert span120" critical="true" description="

Ensure your pronoun, “this”, agrees with your noun.

The pronoun, “this”, is a singular pronoun, and should modify only singular nouns. For plural nouns, use the pronoun, “these”.

Incorrect: My daughter wants to buy this shoes.
Even if the shoes are of the same type, “shoes” is a plural noun. The sentence should be written, “My daughter wants to buy these shoes.”

Correct: My daughter wants to buy this pair of shoes.
The noun, “pair”, is singular, so “this” is the correct pronoun.

Correct: I’m glad there are so many bottles of this delicious wine.
“This” is generally used with uncountable nouns, even if it is in great quantity.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1335696231000″ pid=”3622959″ replacements=”these” sentence=”All I have now is bits of this and bits of that.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>this and bits of that. I am called to lay a foundation. I am called to keep working little at a time… here a little, there a little, building order upon order, precept upon precept. “For it is precept upon precept, precept upon precept, line upon line, line upon line, here a little, there a little.” Isaiah 28:10. When Christ is born in their hearts, they are not for mine to keep, they are for His service and a blessing to many. I am only a steward.



Who is willing to build?
“Those who built on the wall<span caption="Review this sentence for comma use" class="IgnoredPatterns alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure there are no commas between the two nouns in a compound subject or object, or between the two verbs in a compound predicate.

Do not separate the two nouns in a compound subject, nor the two verbs in a compound predicate, with a comma. There can be more than one subject or object in a sentence, and more than one verb in a predicate. Clearly identify all the people or things you are talking about, and the verbs referring to those people or things.

Incorrect: The twins, and their mother went shopping for shoes for school.
The subjects of this sentence are “the twins” and “their mother”.

Incorrect: Mark despaired both finding a job, and having a decent place to live.
The verbs in this predicate are “finding” and “having”.

Correct: Flowers and candles can pleasantly decorate and scent a room.
The objects are “flowers” and “candles”, and the verbs are “decorate” and “scent”

” grammarpoint=”Comma misuse: unnecessary, unexpected or excessive use of comma.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”3812006″ replacements=”___” sentence=””Those who built on the wall, and those who carried burdens, loaded themselves so that with one hand they worked at construction, and with the other held a weapon.” shortdescription=”

Ensure there are no commas between the two nouns in a compound subject or object, or between the two verbs in a compound predicate.

Incorrect: The twins, and their mother went shopping for shoes for school.
Correct: The twins and their mother went shopping for shoes for school.
Incorrect: Mark despaired both finding a job, and having a decent place to live.
Correct: Mark despaired both finding a job and having a decent place to live.

” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>, and those who carried burdens<span caption="Review this sentence for comma use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert" critical="true" description="

Ensure a comma is not separating the subject and the predicate of this sentence, even if the subject is compound.

The comma between the subject (“Those who built on the wall, and those who carried burdens”) and the predicate (“loaded themselves so that with one hand they worked at construction, and with the other held a weapon”) may not be required. Consider removing it.

A compound subject is a subject which lists more than one thing. Commas may be used within the compound subject to separate the nouns, but should not be used between the subject and the predicate of the sentence.

Incorrect: Some frequent causes of headaches are, stress, lack of exercise and dehydration.
The comma between “are” and “stress” should be removed because it separates the predicate from the subject. The other commas are grammatically correct.

Incorrect: Literacy and good writing skills, are necessary in most careers.
The comma in this sentence should be removed. No commas are required in this sentence.

” grammarpoint=”Comma misuse: unnecessary, unexpected or excessive use of comma.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”3812749″ replacements=”___” sentence=””Those who built on the wall, and those who carried burdens, loaded themselves so that with one hand they worked at construction, and with the other held a weapon.” shortdescription=”

The comma between the subject (“Those who built on the wall, and those who carried burdens”) and the predicate (“loaded themselves so that with one hand they worked at construction, and with the other held a weapon”) may not be required. Consider removing it.

Incorrect: Some frequent causes of headaches are, stress, lack of exercise and dehydration.
Correct: Some frequent causes of headaches are, stress, lack of exercise and dehydration.

” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>, loaded themselves so that <span caption="Review this sentence for commas after introductory phrases." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span128" critical="true" description="

The introductory phrase “with one hand” may require a comma after it.

An introductory phrase is like a clause, but it does not have its own subject and verb; it relies on the subject and verb in the main clause. Unless the phrase is very short (less than 5 words) and begins with a preposition (“to”, “for”, “at”, etc.), there should be a comma between the introductory phrase and the main clause.

Incorrect: Fighting against reason Martha decided to pull an all-nighter in hopes of passing the exam.
The introductory phrase “fighting against reason” requires a comma after “reason”.

Correct: By flashlight we made our way along the path.
Because the introductory phrase “by flashlight” is short and begins with a preposition, a comma is not required.

” grammarpoint=”Comma-mark missing where expected.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”3671692″ sentence=””Those who built on the wall, and those who carried burdens, loaded themselves so that with one hand they worked at construction, and with the other held a weapon.” shortdescription=”

The introductory phrase “with one hand” may require a comma after it.

Incorrect: Fighting against reason Martha decided to pull an all-nighter in hopes of passing the exam.
Correct: Fighting against reason, Martha decided to pull an all-nighter in hopes of passing the exam.
Correct: By flashlight we made our way along the path.

” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>with one hand they worked at construction, and with the other held a weapon. 18 Every one of the builders had his sword girded at his side as <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span129" critical="true" description="Review this sentence for pronoun use.

Ensure you have properly used the subjective pronoun in your sentence.

The subjective pronoun “he” may not be appropriately used. Consider changing it to the objective pronoun.

The subjective pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we and they. The objective pronouns are: me, you, him, her, it, our and them. Subjective pronouns are used to replace the name of a person, and do the action the verb suggests. Objective pronouns receive the action the verb suggests.

Incorrect: When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or I.
This is an extremely common error. The easiest way to check it is to remove the second person, “my roommate”. If the second clause read, “…you can give it to I”, the error would be quite obvious: the subjective “I” should be changed to the objective “me”. (correct) When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or me.

Incorrect: Julia does not want to go on a date with he.
This sentence requires an objective pronoun; “he” should be changed to “him”.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”4188861″ sentence=”18 Every one of the builders had his sword girded at his side as he built.”” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>he built.” Nehemiah 4:17,18.

Nehemiah stationed people by families to protect the openings in the walls as <span caption="Review this sentence for pronoun use." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span131" critical="true" description="Review this sentence for pronoun use.

Ensure you have properly used the subjective pronoun in your sentence.

The subjective pronoun “he” may not be appropriately used. Consider changing it to the objective pronoun.

The subjective pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we and they. The objective pronouns are: me, you, him, her, it, our and them. Subjective pronouns are used to replace the name of a person, and do the action the verb suggests. Objective pronouns receive the action the verb suggests.

Incorrect: When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or I.
This is an extremely common error. The easiest way to check it is to remove the second person, “my roommate”. If the second clause read, “…you can give it to I”, the error would be quite obvious: the subjective “I” should be changed to the objective “me”. (correct) When you are finished reading the book, you can give it to my roommate or me.

Incorrect: Julia does not want to go on a date with he.
This sentence requires an objective pronoun; “he” should be changed to “him”.

” grammarpoint=”Pronoun “these”/”those” may not agree with singular noun.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”4188861″ sentence=”Nehemiah stationed people by families to protect the openings in the walls as he rebuilt the walls of Jerusalem.” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>he rebuilt the walls of Jerusalem. Mothers (Those who are involved in bringing <span caption="Review this sentence for adverb placement." class="IgnoredPatterns alert span132" critical="true" description="

Ensure the adverb in your sentence is not between the verb and its direct object.

The adverb (“forth”) may not be correctly positioned in the sentence; consider moving it.

An adverb is a word which modifies a verb; it describes how or when that verb takes place. Most adverbs end in –ly, but not all of them. Be sure to look for words which may be nouns or adjectives but are acting like adverbs. An adverb should not be placed between the verb it is modifying, and the direct object (whatever the verb may be modifying).

Incorrect: The woman applied smoothly the lipstick.
The adverb “smoothly” should not be between the verb “applied” and the direct object, “the lipstick”. The sentence could be re-written as “The woman applied the lipstick smoothly” or “The woman smoothly applied the lipstick”.

Incorrect: I poured slowly the milk into the glass.
So that the verb “poured” is not separated from the direct object “the milk”, the adverb “slowly” should be moved in front of the verb: I slowly poured the milk into the glass.

Incorrect: Mary just went yesterday to the market.
“Yesterday” is being used as an adverb in this sentence (describing when Mary went). The sentence would be better if written: Mary just went to the market yesterday.

” grammarpoint=”Adverb incorrectly positioned between verb and its direct object.” patterndate=”1336402566000″ pid=”6493445″ sentence=”Mothers (Those who are involved in bringing forth spiritual life) I challenge you to load yourself up so that, you will work at building your children with one hand, and with the other hold your weapon that the enemies plot may not come to pass.” shortdescription=”

The adverb (“forth”) may not be correctly positioned in the sentence; consider moving it so it’s not between the verb and its direct object.

Incorrect: I poured slowly the milk into the glass.
Correct: I slowly poured the milk into the glass.

” style=”color: #191c1e; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>forth spiritual life) I challenge you to load yourself up so that, you will work at building your children with one hand, and with the other hold your weapon(the sword of the word of God) that the enemies plot may not come to pass. To me, this is the picture of biblical motherhood.


Happy Mothers Day to all women who bring forth life in the people around you!









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